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TOPIC: 57 Years Ago
#224300
57 Years Ago 2 Weeks ago  
I topped the charts with a song I'd written and recorded as a teenager. After that I sold over 40 million records as a singer and produced hundreds of millions more.
 
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#224320
Wyot

Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
I have always been a little in awe of people who can create musically. I can draw and paint and write a bit - but have no conception of how anyone goes about thinking about creating a song...

Just a mystery to this mind. But very glad that others can!
 
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#224321
Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
Likewise Wyot - thank God, in my case, for three brilliant teachers at Charterhouse (after a shit prep school Stoke House). They taught me how to love and appreciate great writers (Shakespeare; Dickens; Swift). And the pirate radio stations (music and communication). And Top of the Pops (even before I became one of the most featured on the shows along with Cliff and Savile).
 
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#224327
Wyot

Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
I've got my dad to thank for a life long love of lit rather than stellar schools or particularly inspiring teachers.

The local comp was an okay comp and I did fine; but he had the books on the shelves: Shakespeare, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Austen, Steinbeck, Hemmingway...and on...

I had always been a reader but something lit up in my brain when I was off school unwell aged about 13, put down some adventure story or other and first read "Crime & Punishment"....
 
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#224328
Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
A few years ago my book 65 My Life So Far turned up in a second hand shop (my friend Bob Woffinden had died and his library donated to a charity). It had been bought by someone who was at school with me who wrote me correcting a couple of small points and mentioning he was still in touch with my favourite teacher and his wife, now in their late 90s. I wrote him (Paddy Gardiner) thanking him and got back a lovely long letter (he'd kept aware of my life since then and was hugely supportive). He in particular - when I gave a diatribe against Jane Austen to the class - saying she was obsessed by trivia - had gently suggested I read a second of her novels and think of it as like Japanese miniaturisation, making big points with small details. I then, as a consequence, fell in love with all her work. THAT was an example of brilliant teaching.
 
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#224329
Honey

Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
JK2006 wrote:
A few years ago my book 65 My Life So Far turned up in a second hand shop (my friend Bob Woffinden had died and his library donated to a charity). It had been bought by someone who was at school with me who wrote me correcting a couple of small points and mentioning he was still in touch with my favourite teacher and his wife, now in their late 90s. I wrote him (Paddy Gardiner) thanking him and got back a lovely long letter (he'd kept aware of my life since then and was hugely supportive). He in particular - when I gave a diatribe against Jane Austen to the class - saying she was obsessed by trivia - had gently suggested I read a second of her novels and think of it as like Japanese miniaturisation, making big points with small details. I then, as a consequence, fell in love with all her work. THAT was an example of brilliant teaching.

Is there a way I can be helped to appreciate Hemingway? I accept that I must be missing something, or others wouldn't rave about his work, but to me he sounds like the rambling drunk that you hope will go home soon.
 
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#224330
Wyot

Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
JK2006 wrote:
He in particular - when I gave a diatribe against Jane Austen to the class - saying she was obsessed by trivia - had gently suggested I read a second of her novels and think of it as like Japanese miniaturisation, making big points with small details. I then, as a consequence, fell in love with all her work. THAT was an example of brilliant teaching.

That is indeed inspired and true. All of life in a grain of sand. You can learn as much about the human condition from a novel set only on a Number 12 bus as on all the battlefields of Europe....
 
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#224332
Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
Tend to agree with you on Hemingway Honey though some years ago I bought and gave an Arabic version of The Old Man And The Sea to a friend in Tunisia who adored fishing, swimming and being on boats and he told me, after reading it, that was the greatest event of his young life.
Yes WYOT Paddy Gardiner was SO right and that's why Austen's novels (and to a degree her adaptations - who will ever gorget Colin Firth doing an Ursula Andress?) are so wonderful. The wisdom of life is such a marvellous thing and so many are blind to it as they age.
But it was, in many ways, how PG did it that impressed me.
I was, of course, grand standing and making the class roar with laughter by my controversial remarks.
He could have put me down or sent me up in front of them (I deserved it).
Instead he quietly accepted my criticism (at least it showed I'd read it and thought about it - which most of the class clearly hadn't) and made his point; which changed my life.
As did much else he and others did (another teacher - Spike Phillips - went out of his way to tell Cambridge I should sit for the scholarship exam - which I failed - and then be given a place anyway, since I cared about and thought about Literature).
Wonderful teachers. I owe so much to them all.
And hopefully have passed on the love (I just sat in the car hearing a Phil Collins hit followed by Mike and the Mechanics followed by a solo Peter Gabriel and thought - without me; these songs would probably not even exist).
THAT is the legacy of my great teachers.
 
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#224341
Green Man

Re:57 Years Ago 1 Week, 5 Days ago  
(I just sat in the car hearing a Phil Collins hit followed by Mike and the Mechanics followed by a solo Peter Gabriel and thought - without me; these songs would probably not even exist

You're so accurate on that. I know a of Genesis fans who have no idea who Flaming Youth are. I hope their stuff gets a reissue.

I played Dance In To The Light today.
 
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