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King of Hits
Home arrow Legal arrow Police Tricks 23 - Being Ill
Police Tricks 23 - Being Ill PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 04 July 2019
Police tricks 23 - Being Ill.

One of the things I’ve discovered from a member of the judiciary since my aborted debacle is a trick both police and witnesses use if it appears a trial is not going their way.

Encouraged by lawyers involved in the case, if it looks like their incompetence, corruption or, worst of all, criminal behaviour is liable to be exposed to the court and the judge, they find a helpful doctor or medical expert and are declared ill. Not just sick but seriously disabled. Cancer or heart problems or a stroke - anything which enables them to be so unwell as to have to withdraw from giving evidence and, more crucially, getting cross examined.

This kind of sworn appearance could either damage all hopes of convicting an innocent person or get the witness, cop or other person to face a trial themselves, for perjury or attempting to pervert the course of justice.

Especially as these days Judges are getting wiser and better at spotting lies or flaws in evidence.

I hasten to add that this is a general observation; not aimed at any specific person. I would hate to accuse anyone of so serious an offence. But I’m reliably informed that this has become a frequent ploy for dodgy characters who anticipate problems if their behaviour is too closely examined.

So - a word to others who may face false allegations, or any other prosecution based on a desire to convict someone of a crime, whether intentionally intended or done with the best of motives but flawed methods.

Especially if the person, suddenly declared too ill to appear or be questioned for any length of time, recovers miraculously within weeks of the trial collapsing, being abandoned or failing, and returns to work, fit, healthy and happy, beaming with the joys of life, quite possibly suntanned and slightly overweight.

 
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