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TOPIC: Strange Bedfellows
#183006
Barney

Strange Bedfellows 3 Weeks ago  
The 'confidence and supply' agreement between the Tories and the DUP is dead in the water - with the NI party now abstaining on crucial votes.

Ms May promised £1b to NI for the DUP support (they have 10 MPs), and about half that figure has already been paid.

But the DUP, who don't like the Tory Brexit deal - and notwithstanding what happens with the 1922 Committee - will be pivotal and significant.


Enticements could be offered to them again - but should this small and extremist party be allowed to dictate (or have a major say in) the economic future of the UK?


 
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#183016
Re:Strange Bedfellows 3 Weeks ago  
Barney wrote:
The 'confidence and supply' agreement between the Tories and the DUP is dead in the water - with the NI party now abstaining on crucial votes.

Ms May promised £1b to NI for the DUP support (they have 10 MPs), and about half that figure has already been paid.

But the DUP, who don't like the Tory Brexit deal - and notwithstanding what happens with the 1922 Committee - will be pivotal and significant.


Enticements could be offered to them again - but should this small and extremist party be allowed to dictate (or have a major say in) the economic future of the UK?




If I remember rightly, you predicted exactly this, right from the start.
It is a horrible situation and I cant see there being a happy solution.
 
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#183023
Barney

Re:Strange Bedfellows 3 Weeks ago  
Like so many others, I did.

To pay for political support (to the Province of Northern Ireland, not to the DUP directly) is foolhardy - and bound to end in tears.

In the overall scheme of things, the DUP is an inconsequential and small party - with a violent history (like IRA/Sinn Fein) - and only considers its own vested interests.

For our government to need such support for our biggest post war economic decision - is a said indictment of said government.


 
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#183056
Barney

Re:Strange Bedfellows 2 Weeks, 6 Days ago  
Not only NI, now

But fishing issues with several EU states


And Gibraltar


Leaving a club isn't easy


Particularly when commitments have been made to the club

Without specific deadlines and/or monetary exit formulae



 
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#183504
Barney

Re:Strange Bedfellows 6 Days, 11 Hours ago  
Barney wrote:
Ms May promised £1b to NI for the DUP support (they have 10 MPs), and about half that figure has already been paid


A rash decision, to rely on the Democratic Unionist Party - with 10 MPs.

Knowing the DUP are only interested in one thing. That is the wellbeing and dominance of Protestism in Northern Ireland.


Ironically - Sinn Fein, with a terrorism background also - still refuse to take their elected seats at Westminster (although they accept the expenses/payments).

They support Catholicism and the Republic of Ireland - and, if they decided to take their seats (almost as many as the DUP), they could well swing the impending Brexit decision.




 
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#183522
Barney

Re:Strange Bedfellows 5 Days, 21 Hours ago  
Northern Ireland was created today in 1921, with the partition of Ireland; the South became a dominion.

Since the troubles (guerrilla warfare) began in the late 60s, there has been 50,000 casualties - and 3,500 deaths.

By far, the bloodiest part of the UK - and many residents hope that Brexit will afford it the stability to put the conflicts permanently in the past.


There is a fear though that - if loyalist and/or republican extremists don't get their way - the violence could erupt again.

Yet another dimension of the Brexit saga...



 
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